Photoshoot at Bøler Church: Bowery Tunic

Several months after the Bowery Tunic came back from its trip to the US and the Interweave offices in Colorado, it was time to photograph it in my chosen style. Bowery Tunic was made for knit.wear Spring/Summer 2017 in the divine Madeline Tosh DK in the hand-dyed colourway of Tern. Model Emma Ross with her flaming red hair – perfected by hair & makeup stylist Sissel Fylling – made it look stunning. I decided to style it with black pencil pants, high heeled shoes by Camilla Skovgaard and Kaja Gjedebo’s aptly named “Amazing Mamas Earrings“. Photographer Eivind Røhne knew exactly where he wanted Emma to stand in the entrance at Bøler Church, so that he could capture the best moments.

A cable panel with electronic vibes is the focus point for this a-line pullover with a longer back ending in a vent in the sides. The collar, just like the bottom edge, is in garter stitch and crowns the garment with its i-cord bind off. The Madeline Tosh DK yarn is made of 100% merino wool with 206 meters/225 yards on each 120 gram skein and comes in an amazing 124 hand-dyed colourways.

The sample is knitted in size M with 105.5 cm/41.5″ bust circumference and modelled with 19 cm/7.5″ of positive ease on Em. The tunic is graded into 6 sizes with a bust circumference from 85 to 136 cm/33.5 to 53.5″. The back is one cable pattern repeat longer than the front, 11 cm/4.25″. It is knitted by yours truly using 4 mm/US 6 with a gauge of 20 stitches and 30 rows in stocking stitch measuring 10 cm/4″ square.

The intricate cables are fun to knit in a mixture of rib and garter stitch that moves across both the front and the back of the tunic. I found their volume and texture too much for the sleeves and opted for a garter stitch panel on the center of the sleeve since I do love texture. As you might know I also get easily bored working just in stocking stitch.

I did not intend for the back to be in fade, but considering how popular the trend of fading is – in knitting, that is – I am happy with it. This particular fade is actually a result of not alternating skeins, as you should with hand-dyed yarn. Anyway, I think I will have a go at fade on purpose very soon.

The English pattern is in knit.wear Spring/Summer 2017  available in both a digital and a print edition and it will be added to my Ravelry store at the end of March. You can also buy the German version of the magazine Strickmode. The Norwegian pattern will be published in the special magazine called Familien Strikk out on Monday 12th March.

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Photoshoot at Bøler Church: Melva

Melva, here worn by the gorgeous Emma Ross, is currently being test knitted so the pattern will be launched at the Edinburgh Yarn Festival (EYF) in March. Em’s hair & makeup is by Sissel Fylling and her fantastic jewellery by Kaja Gjedebo Design. Photographer Eivind Røhne brilliantly captured the scene and made sure the letters “Bø” from “Bøler Kirke” (read: as in “Boo!”) was visible. Named after Melva, Celtic for ruler is this straight sweater with fancy cables at the bottom and the top. Ribbing in the side makes the sweater figure hugging. While the stockinette stitch center panel shows off the stunning hand dyed The Little Grey Sheep, British Stein Fine Wool 4ply. The sleeve mirrors the body, but it is worked flat unlike the body.

Em is wearing size XS with a bust circumference of 88 cm/34.75″ with 2.5 cm/1″ positive ease. I have graded the pattern from size XS to 2XL with a finished bust circumference of 88 to 124 cm/34.75 to 48.75″. I chose to style the pullover with a pair of Prada trousers in a mauve colour, that perfectly matched the nail varnish shade Sissel chose. The shoes, not in any of these photos, are Carla in Wine by Monica Stålvang, just in case you were wondering.

The Little Grey Sheep, British Stein Fine Wool 4ply is made of wool from Emma Boyles’s sheep at Well Manor – a small family farm on the Surrey Hampshire borders in the UK. It is 100% wool with 330 meters/360 yards on each 100 gram skein. I used a 3 mm/US 2.5 needle and got a gauge of 26 stitches and 34 rows in stocking stitch measuring 10 cm/4″ square. I wanted a red shade and Emma suggested the shade named Outback and kindly offered to sponsor the yarn.

The delicate and intricate cable is again from Norah Gaughan’s excellent Knitted Cable Sourcebook. The Melva pattern will be released on Ravelry and a sample of the pullover will be on show at The Little Grey Sheep stand at EYF in March.

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Photoshoot at Bøler Church: Airic

I loved seeing Airic on Emma Ross, and how stylish she made it look. Make up & Hair Stylist Sissel Fylling made sure her stunning hair looked immaculate and set off the grey background at Bøler Kirke/Church. Eivind Røhne brilliantly captured the moment while Michael was making sure the lights were switched off. The statement silver jewellery is by Kaja Gjedebo Design. Airic – In a contemporary style with provocative visual lines – created by the sideways knitted cable panel to make a waterfall bottom – is this long cardigan. The body is all in stockinette stitch to offset the cables. Even the sleeve has a cable panel knitted sideways as a cuff. Airic is Celtic for agreeable, just as this long cardigan will cover you up. It is knitted in the divine Di Gilpin’s  Lalland Lambswool and is a Scottish lambswool with a magical twist.

Em has changed into sculptural shoes by Camilla Skovgaard and a black tube top for this second sequence of photos taken by the spacious entrance to the church hall. Airic is knitted in the soft Di Gilpin’s  Lalland Lambswool made of 100% Scottish lambswool and comes in 50 grams balls with 175 meters/191 yards. Airic was knitted by Kristin Nygård, aka Quiltefeen on Ravelry and Instagram, using a 3.75 mm/US 5 needle and with a 24 stitches & 30 rows in stocking stitch to 10 cm/4″ square gauge.

The cable panel on the lower body is worked sideways, then the upper body is picked up and knitted along the long side of lower body and worked from the bottom and up. The upper body is worked back and forth in one piece with false seams from the pick up on the lower body to the underarm, then the upper fronts and back are worked separately.

Emma is wearing size S, but it will become available in sizes XS to 2XL with a bust circumference of 86 to 128 cm/33.75 to 50.5″ with the collar overlapped.  In these photos the collar is just folded down. As you might see it has the same silhouette as the Rørbye Cardigan recently published in knit.wear Fall/Winter 2017 knitted in Dale Garn Eco Wool. These magnificent rib braids are also found in Norah Gaughan’s Knitted Cable Sourcebook. I chose to add garter stitches to the sides to this one and knitted the last stitch on the Lower Body instead of making an I-cord edge.

Both the Norwegian and the English pattern will be released in April, after the test knitting is finished. It begins 26th February in my Ravelry group. In addition to meeting Di Gilpin in Vienna last year, I also met Emma Boyles of The Little Grey Sheep. So next out among these professional photos is Melva, knitted in British Stein Fine Wool 4ply hand-dyed by Emma herself.

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Photoshoot at Bøler Church: Ardra

Here is Ardra professionally photographed by Eivind Røhne, worn by the gorgeous Emma Ross at Bøler Kirke/Church, late in October. Yes, I did know that the cognac shade of Sølje by Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk would suit Em perfectly. Sissel Fylling did start by cutting Em’s hair and had her assistant Nora helping her. Jewellery designer Kaja Gjedebo Design, who lives close to the church, were also with us for the first part of the day. I styled the pullover with black pencil pants, a turtle neck and Monica Stålvang’s stunning boots. Here is my introduction to Ardra: Round knot cables run along the body of this a-line pullover with a slightly longer back. Only one cable adorns each sleeve. The body is worked in the round and ends in a round neck with an I-cord bind-off. A false seam on the sides make the fit better. Ardra is Celtic and means noble.

The yarn kit was launched at Oslo Design Fair in January by Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk and will shortly be available in selected yarn stores. The pullover was beautiful knitted, using 3 mm/US 2.5 and a 24 stitches and 32 rows gauge, by Kristin Nygård, aka Quiltefeen on Ravelry and Instagram, since I was busy working on another new design. Sølje Pelsull is made of 100% pelt wool with 350 meters/383 yards on each 100 gram skein and comes in 30 beautiful shades.

The body is knitted in the round with short rows for a longer curved hem at the back up to the armhole. Then it is worked back and forth in Back and Front. The sleeves are knitted in the round up to the armhole. Emma is wearing size Small with 4.5 cm/1.75″ positive ease. I have graded the pattern from size XS to 2XL with a bust circumference of 84 to 126 cm/33 to 49.5″.

Finally the back view with the extra long curve at the bottom. The cables are from Norah Gaughan’s brilliant Knitted Cable Sourcebook, and appear smaller due to the thinner yarn than on the poncho Donia. The English pattern for Ardra will be test knitted in my Ravelry group beginning on 23rd of April before it is released in mid June.

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Photoshoot at Bøler Church: Barra

Barra was photographed at Bøler Kirke/Church in the opposite corner to Cahal, to complement the light brown Sølje yarn by Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk the cardigan is made of. Just as brilliant photographer Eivind Røhne suggested. I was delighted to see gorgeous model Emma Ross, with makeup & hair by Sissel Fylling and jewellery by Kaja Gjedebo Design, wearing the jacket with such flair. Barra is styled with pencil pants and a black turtleneck as well as with Monica Stålvang’s stunning boots. Here is my introduction to the cardigan: Elaborate spear cables run like a spine on the back of this long jacket before they are moved towards the shoulder at the top. At the front one cable follow the line along the v-neck. The sleeve has a spear cable running around it at the bottom, before the upper part is knitted in the round in stockinette stitch. The a-line cardigan is named Barra – Celtic for spear.

The cardigan was beautifully knitted by Anne Langfjæran, aka kosekontoret on Instagram, using 3 mm/US 2.5 needles to a gauge of 24 stitches and 34 rows/rounds in stocking stitch to 10 cm/4″ square. Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk, Sølje is made of 100% pelt yarn with 350 meters/383 yards on each 100 gram skein in a lovely melange brown. Emma is wearing size Small with 4.5 cm/1.75″ positive ease. I have graded the pattern from size XS to 2XL with a bust circumference of 84 to 126 cm/33 to 49.5″.

The body is worked flat in pieces, unlike the long sleeves which are worked in the round after the sideways cable panel to the armhole. Stitches are picked up along right side of cable panel for the top sleeve. The cable is the same I used on the pullover Melva and found in Norah Gaughan’s inspirational Knitted Cable Sourcebook. I attached 10 buttons with a 15 mm/0.52″ diameter on the button band which is picked up and knitted at the end.

Here is the a view of the back, and you can see how the cables are moved towards the shoulder at the top, while they are moved from the v-neck shaping at the front. The Norwegian Barra yarn kits were launched by Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk at Oslo Design Fair, while the Norwegian pattern will be released shortly and available at Ravelry. The English pattern will be test knitted in my Ravelry group beginning on the 14th May and it will be released around 6 weeks later.

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Photoshoot at Bøler Church: Cahal

Next out is Cahal in my series of pictures from our photoshoot at Bøler Kirke/Church brilliantly taken by Eivind Røhne. The vest, knitted in Olive Green Tinde Pelsull from Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk, looked stunning on model Emma Ross with hair & makeup by Sissel Fylling and jewellery by Kaja Gjedebo Design. The perfect boots are by Monica Stålvang. Cahal, and the other three designs in the Hillesvåg Collection, were all styled with black pencil pants and a black turtle neck pullover. Cahal is an Origami vest with reversible cables that folds into shape. Vents are made by leaving the seam open at the bottom. The horizontal seam draws a line across the shoulders ending in a curve at the armhole. You can wear the vest with both sides out by making a neat or flat seam. The name Cahal is Celtic for strong in battle.

Emma is wearing size S, with a finished bust measurement of 106.5 cm/42″ but the Cahal is also available in sizes M/L and XL/2XL with these measurements: 117 (127) cm/46 (50)”. The vest is knitted in two parts. The front is a square, while the back has 30.5 cm/12″ extra body length that folds to the front at each shoulder to form the upper front and the neck opening.

Cahal is knitted using 3.5 mm/US 4 circular needle and a gauge of 21 stitches and 30 rows in stocking stitch measuring 10 cm/4″ square. I was fortunate to have Grete Jenssen, aka ma9 on Ravelry, knitting this vest for me. The lovely yarn, Tinde Pelsull, is made of 100% pelt wool, with 260 meters/284 yards per 100 gram skein.

The back of Cahal with the courtyard next to the chapel at Bøler Church in the background. We could not have planned the colour scheme with all the natural materials any better. I love this straight back view. The intricate cables are from Norah Gaughan’s brilliant Knitted Cable Sourcebook.

Not only the cables are reversible on this vest, I think the whole garment is reversible. I considered working a flat neat seam, but opted for a visible seam creating an even more marked shoulder line instead. Seams with the sewing allowance visible is in fashion at the moment and I like the rougher look it gave to the vest. As usual I used a crochet hook and worked a slip stitch seam. This cropped photo was chosen as the cover for the retailers brochure by Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk.

Sissel wanted to try out a new hair style on these reverse set of photos and added several extra hair bands on Emma’s wonderful hair. We were all in favour and waited patiently as she did it. Above you can see the result! I also love this stylish photo and I am so grateful for having such a wonderful team!

Last, is the view of the back with the wrong side out. The English pattern will be test knitted in my Ravelry group before its release. The test knit will begin 9th of April. The Norwegian pattern will be released shortly. The yarn kits were launched last week at the Oslo Design Fair and will be available online at Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk’s website: www.ull.no and in selected yarn stores shortly.

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Oslo Design Fair – January 2018

What happened to January? I had so many plans but did not get very far at all. Anyway, I did make it to the first day of the Oslo Design Fair at Lillestrøm on Wednesday 24th of January. I was looking forward to seeing my new designs in collaboration with Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk on display at their stand together with large posters of Emma Ross photographed by Eivind Røhne at Bøler Kirke/Church in Oslo last October. Michael came with me and took these photographs. Above you can see the Cahal knitted in Olive green Tinde Pelsull, Ardra knitted in Cognac Sølje Pelsull and Barra knitted in Brown Sølje Pelsull. On the floor are the yarn kits, and in the two boxes closest to Ardra are the Tinde Pelsull while the new lambswool yarn Sol is in the next two boxes.

Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk had printed a brochure for retailers and I saw it for the first time, fresh from the printers in the photo above. Here I am talking to Øyvind Myhr since both Berit and Anette were busy taking orders. On the wall to the right is Donia. The sample is on display at the front of the stand. I am wearing my design Kathe Cardigan knitted in SweetGeorgia Superwash Sport, made for Interweave Knits Fall 2016. Yarn kit with Norwegian patterns and printed patterns will soon go on sale in selected yarn stores in Norway and online at Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk. Digital patterns will be available after test knitting in my Ravelry group in both Norwegian and English during the spring.

I met up with several designers during the day to my delight. Here is Creative Director at House of Yarn, Margaretha Finseth (yes, the editor of the Norwegian Knitting Designs book) telling Tove Fevang and me about the new yarns from Du Store Alpakka. As you can see from these photos there was plenty of space at this trade fair on the first day.

The fair also showcases jewellery, clothing, interiors and decorations in addition to yarn. Kaja Gjedebo had a stand again this time and I had to visit. Kaja is presenting the news to designer Bente Presterud Røvik who joined Tove and me. Thankfully, Kaja had made a new brochure so that we could easily make our wish-lists. In between visiting the stands, I had several coffee breaks and enjoyed catching up with designer Iselin Hafseld and handcraft editor at Familien Åse Myhrvold Egeland. I had a great day and received more design commissions so I will stay busy.

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Ena Buttons by Siri Berrefjord

Now, a study of the details, the bespoke buttons hand-made by Siri Berrefjord especially for my new design Ena. I ordered 12 buttons in the size small with a diameter of 18 millimeters/0.7″ in an orange-brown colour, by e-mail. I sent Siri my swatch – while I was knitting the sample – so that she could match the colour and take some wonderful photos. Siri is a trained photographer, as well as a jewellery designer, clothes designer and now also an co-author, see her Norwegian book: Redesign. Ena, Celtic for  fiery – perfect for both the colour and for the amount of cables – is knitted in the divine Acadia by The Fibre Co. in the shade Orange Storm. I made the swatch to check my gauge but also to find a spine for the back and checked whether I wanted a plain column of rib or a twisted stitch. Just seeing the knitted swatch is such a detail is like yarn porn. And, yes, there is such a thing. We knitters know all about this.

I specified that I wanted orange buttons with brown in them. Siri made the perfect match as you can see. Each button is like a piece of jewellery with immaculate texture to it. The design is based on the silver broches for the traditional folk costume, called “bunad” in Norwegian. They are moulded in plastic then painted with several layers.

As always I am impressed by the composition of the photos, making sure the background matches or contrasts the object in the photograph. It is such a fun and successful collaboration. Take a look at these previous designs: Helka, Gyda and Icelandic Jacket.

The cables I chose for Ena, are by Norah Gaughan and found in her brilliant Knitted Cable Sourcebook. The woven cables are ideal for the Acadia yarn, made of 60% merino wool, 20% alpaca, 20% silk with 133 meters/145 yards on each 50 gram skein and it is a luxury to both knit and to wear.You will find a selection of Siri’s buttons available in her shop on Epla here: Siris Skattkammer and more divine photos on her website: Fredenshavn. The finished sample of Ena was professionally photographed by Eivind Røhne at Bøler Church and you can see the photos in my blogpost: Photoshoot at Bøler Church; Ena. The English pattern will be test knitted in my Ravelry group, beginning on March 12th, before it is released at the end of April.

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Photoshoot at Bøler Church: Ena

The next set of photos from our shoot is of Ena, knitted in The Fibre Company’s Acadia, beautifully worn by Emma Ross leaning towards the rusty cor-ten wall panel with Bøler Kirke/Church carved into it. Photographer Eivind Røhne who captured these brilliant shoots made sure to position Em so that the two letters “Bø” as in “Boo!” was visible at all times. Yes, we do have a lot of fun! Hair & makeup stylist Sissel Fylling made sure that Em’s hair was not covering up the collar. On Em’s finger is one of Kaja Gjedebo Design’s statement rings in gold-plated silver.

Ena is Celtic for fiery. As you need to be passionate about cables to make this jacket. The woven cables lean towards the left and the right hence the spine has been accentuated with a twisted stitch at the center back and along front opening. Ribbing in the sides make the jacket appear casually fitted. The collar in rib can be worn open or closed and folded over. Ena is knitted in the rustic Acadia with silk noil from The Fibre Company.

The bespoke buttons are made by Siri Berrefjord in a brown orange colour she matched to my knitted swatch, ideal for this dressy jacket I styled with a pair of wide silk trousers in navy. The handmade buttons are moulded in plastic after old traditional national costume/bunad silver. You can look forward to seeing her stunning photos later. Siri is also a photographer so even the yarn and stitch definition can then be studied in detail!

The cable I chose is from Norah Gaughan’s brilliant Knitted Cable Sourcebook, so no surprise there, as I have found a lot of inspiration in it. The Acadia yarn, made of 60% merino wool, 20% alpaca, 20% silk with 133 meters/145 yards on each 50 gram skein and it is a luxury to both knit and to wear. I used a 4 mm/US 6 needle with a 21 stitches and 30 rows  in Stocking stitch measuring 10 cm/4″ square gauge. The jacket is made in pieces and seamed. The collar is picked up and knitted before the buttonband. The last buttonhole is on collar before fold over.

Em is wearing size S with a bust circumference of 92 cm/36.25″, worn with 6 cm/2.25″ positive ease. The cardigan is graded in sizes XS to 2XL with a bust circumference of 84 to 124 cm/33 to 48.75″. The English pattern will be test knitted in my Ravelry group, beginning on March 12th, before it is released at the end of April.

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Photoshoot at Bøler Church: Donia

I am so excited to show you the photos of the gorgeous Emma Ross, with hair & makeup by Sissel Fylling & jewellery by Kaja Gjedebo Design, wearing Donia, captured by Eivind Røhne at Bøler Kirke/Church in Oslo last October. Yes, I did select the medium blue in Tinde Pelsull by Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk to go with Emma’s hair and because it was a shade I wanted to use for some time. We started our photoshoot at Bøler Kirke/Church in the courtyard next to the chapel. The colour of all the natural materials worked so well together with the colours I has chosen for the collection for Hillesvåg Ullvarefabrikk, to be launched at Oslo Design Fair. I decided to style the poncho with high heeled boots from Norwegian designer Monica Stålvang, and black pencil pants.

Round knot cables adorn the bottom and the top of this poncho. A high collar gives it a noble look, hence the name Donia; Celtic for rules all. The upper part is picked up and knitted from the lower cable panel and worked in stockinette stitch with shaping for the shoulders. The short sleeves in rib hold the poncho together. You can wear it with a belt or a shawl pin to gather it at the front or loose, just as you prefer.This was Kaja’s favourite from the shoot, and she borrowed it when Emma had changed into the next garment. I have made the design in one size, but it can be adjusted to your preference in both width and length. The bust circumference is 194 cm/76.5″ and the length is 74.5 cm/29.25. The sleeve length is 32 cm/12.5″.

The body is knitted in four parts with cables on bottom part and stockinette stitch on the upper part. A long circular needle is used to accommodate the large number of stitches. The sleeves are knitted in the round in rib. The collar is knitted separately using a provisional cast-on so that the ends can be grafted together. If you prefer to have the collar loose, pick up and knit stitches around the neck and work an I-cord bind-off.

Donia is knitted using 3.5 mm/US 4 with a gauge of 21 stitches and 30 rows in stocking stitch measures 10 cm/4″ square. The Tinde Pelsull yarn is made of 100% pelt wool with 260 meters/284 yards on each 100 gram skein and it comes in 30 divine shades.

The last photo of Donia shows it worn with a belt. Sissel and I decided to use the wide belt on Emma. It is only the front piece that is gathered together with the belt, while the back piece is left to hang loose and hence seem longer. The yarn kit with a Norwegian pattern will be launched at Oslo Design Fair at the end of January, while the English pattern will be test knitted in my Ravelry group, beginning on March 5th, before it is released at the end of April.

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