Munch 150

The most comprehensive presentation of Edvard Munch’s art ever displayed is currently on at the National Gallery in Oslo, covering the years 1882-1903, and at the Munch Museum, covering the years 1904-1944. Edvard Munch was artistically active for more than 60 years from his debut in the early 1880s until his death in 1944 and this exhibition illustrates the scope of it. “In his day he elicited anger and admiration for his unorthodox style of painting. His continual experimentation arouses interest even today. The enormous scope of the exhibition has been made possible through cooperation between the National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design and the Munch Museum. The works on display have been selected from the museums’ own collections and supplemented by generous loans from public and private institutions in Norway and abroad.” In addition Edvard Munch’s monumental paintings can be experienced in the University of Oslo Aula – including The Sun (see below) and in the Dining Hall (read: employee cafeteria) at Freia Chocolate Factory and his studio at Ekely. They are open at weekends during the exhibition period: 2. June – 13. October. The exhibition is inspiring and haunting at the same time. Munch depicts the creative and destructive powers of love to an astonishing depth of raw emotion. An exhibition not to be missed if you are in Oslo. Enjoy his paintings (see press) at: munch150

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4 Responses to Munch 150

  1. Janieb says:

    Oh I adore his work.

  2. I so wish that I lived near enough to a large city that I could enjoy special exhibits such as this. I do make it to New York City once or twice a year, so I guess that I shouldn’t complain too much, but there is always so much to take I while I’m there, I can’t do it all. How wonderful that this exhibit is so accessible to you – enjoy!

    • Yes, it is an advantage even though Oslo is quite small to be a capital – only 500 000 inhabitants! I have only done part 1 of this exhibit and look forward to seeing the remaining parts! Thank you, Tracy!

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