Eira Pullover and Rørbye Cardigan in knit.wear Fall/Winter 2017

I am proud to present the 2 designs I have in the knit.wear Fall/Winter 2017 issue: Eira Pullover and Rørbye Cardigan. How could I decline when editor Meghan Babin wanted not only one but two of my designs for this issue? Despite our move coinciding with the deadline in April, I took the offer gladly (read: I did not ask my husband for his opinion). Of course I had some obstacles not only in the knitting of them but also during our move, but that is life. I submitted the Eira pullover as Kanik to the Winter Whites theme as follows: A visually striking pullover that is both chic and comfortable, named Kanik; Eskimo for snowflake after the intricate center cable. The stunning cable adorns the center front and back and is framed by a braid on each side. While Seed stitch fills the background in the sides to allow the cables to shine, on this straight sweater. A saddle shoulder allows the staghorn sleeve cable to continue all the way to the neck. Above is the cover with Susanna Ic’s Demetria Cowl on the cover.

knit.wear / Harper Point Photography

In the letter from the Editor, Meghan writes in “our Winter Whites story, we offer a clean slate for your exploration of cables and traditional techniques.” My Eira Pullover is knitted in the divine The Fibre Co. Cumbria made of 60% merino wool, 30% brown mash wool, 10% mohair, with 218 meters/238 yards per 100 gram skeins in the shade Scafell Pike using 4 mm/US 6 needles. The gauge is 23 stitches and 28 rows in Moss stitch measures 10 cm/4″ square.

knit.wear / Harper Point Photography

The sample is made in the smallest size with a 81 cm/32″ bust circumference and it is worn with zero ease. The largest size has a bust circumference of  123 cm/48.5″, and there are four sizes in between.The pullover is knitted flat and seamed in order to give it the best shape and support. Only the collar is worked in the round.

knit.wear / Harper Point Photography

I love the styling with the white trousers by Tina Gill and the hair & make up by Janie Rocek. These beautiful photos by Harper Point Photography do show it off so well. My other contribution is for the Cypress & Plum story. “Inspired by Dutch Master paintings of the Golden Era, you’ll find a canvas on which you can delve into rich jewel tones and exquisite fibres.” Rørbye Cardigan was submitted as Anuri: In a contemporary style with provocative visual lines – created by the sideways knitted cable panel to make a waterfall bottom – is this long cardigan. The body is all in stockinette stitch to offset the cables. Eventhe sleeve has a cable panel knitted sideways as a cuff. Anuri is Eskimo for wind, just as this long cardigan will blow around you.

knit.wear / Harper Point Photography

The reversible cable is from Norah Gaughan’s excellent Knitted Cable Sourcebook. The reason the shoulder is worn so far out in the photo above is because the interfacing is worn flat and not folded as intended. The sample is knitted in Dale Garn Eco Wool made of 70% wool, 30% alpaca, 112 meters/122 yards per 50 g skein in 1233 grey green knitted using 4 mm/US 6. The cardigan shown is the second size and measures 46.5 cm/18.25″ back width on a model with a 86.5 cm/34″ bust. The smallest size has a back width of 44 cm/17.25″ and the largest 64.5 cm/25.5″, and three sizes in between.

@ knit.wear / Harper Point Photography

The lower body of this cardigan is worked from side to side. The upper body is worked back and forth in one piece from the pick-up on the lower body to the underarm, then the upper fronts and back are worked separately. The sleeve cuffs are worked from side to side, then the sleeve is worked in the round to the underarm. The collar is worked back and forth in two pieces.

@ knit.wear / Harper Point Photography

Here is the collar with the WS showing and you can clearly see the interfacing worked in rib. I did consider making the collar without the interfacing, but decided I wanted to be able to fold it back and also have the extra warmth it provides. The obstacles I had was the length of the upper body as well as sleeves. Both were too long so they had to be adjusted during finishing. There is always a risk involved when I am trying out a new silhouette and not certain about the length of each piece.

@ knit.wear / Harper Point Photography

The back view shows 3 cables at the bottom and one at the top of the lower body. It does take a second to distinguish the single cable in the panel with the three. The cable is worked in rib and not as difficult to knit as it looks. There are a lot of wonderful designs in this issue and I am in great company! Thank you, knit.wear! The knit.wear Fall/Winter 2017 is available in a digital edition and in a print edition. In Norway you can soon buy the magazine at the larger Narvesen kiosks or ask your local one to order it for you. Photos of me wearing these designs taken at the beach in Ørje on a very cold April day is coming.

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2 Responses to Eira Pullover and Rørbye Cardigan in knit.wear Fall/Winter 2017

  1. Sandra says:

    Awesome Linda. Fell in love with both but Eira made my knees buckle.

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